Rahab’s House

Joshua sent two spies to Jericho as the Children of Israel were preparing to cross over the river Jordan and enter the Promise Land.  When they entered into the city of Jericho they went to the house of Rahab which was in the north end of the wall that surrounded the city.  We know that it was on the top of the wall because she hid the spies under flax that she had dried on the roof of her house. Jericho was the home of the temple of the god Yerach, which later became known as Baal. The book of Hebrews, Rahab is called a prostitute. Which likely meant she was a temple prostitute.

She was trying to make a new life for herself with the flax that was on the roof. The scarlet rope the spies climbed out of her window and they had her leave it there so they would know it was her house when they returned. She was concerned about her family and made the spies promise that they would be safe when the Hebrews would attack.  The family was very important to her.  Maybe, because that is all that she had.

Rahab was not really a part of the community.  She lived on the wall, the very edge of the town.  As a prostitute, she was shunned by the women and used by the men. Her social status was equal to that of a sorcerer or a demon possessed person.  She was exposed to abuse and disease.

She probably had a list of emotional hurts a mile long.  Let’s just name some of them:

1.   Bitterness at what life had dealt her.
2.   Feeling unworthy.
3.   Feeling unloved.
4.   Feeling like trash.
5.   Feeling rejected.
6.   Anger
7.   Unable to trust others people.
8.   Feeling used
9.   Feeling dirty.
10. Friendless
11. Feeling like everyone is talking about her behind her back.
12. The center of jokes.
13. Not good enough

The list can go on.  Each one of the hurts adding to the other, intensifying as the day goes by. As an outcast, you can’t get much further out of the center of town than the wall surrounding it.  How she longed for a second chance at life.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s